When Paul Feig Says “Please Don’t Read This Chapter,” He Means It.

As you can see, I finally settled on Paul Feig for the celebrity author of the week. For those of you who don’t know Mr. Feig’s work, he created cult classic T.V. series Freaks and Geeks, played science teacher “Mr. Gene Pool” on the first season of Sabrina, The Teenage Witch, had a part on the very short-lived Dirty Dancing T.V. series from the late-eighties*, and recently served as a co-executive producer on The Office.

He also wrote Superstud: Or How I Became a 24-Year-Old Virgin, which chronicles Feig’s sexual awakening/young adult love life. I felt for younger Feig, as it is very clear the man was very, very sexually frustrated, the frustration brought on by a conflict with his religious beliefs. I wish Feig had touched more on this, as I found his “conversations”  with God entertaining and so true. Religion and sex are both touchy subjects when faced separately, but bring them together and it’s so weird–you follow these beliefs, but what to do about the biological urges?

Then again, if Feig spent the entirety of Superstud discussing the eternal debate of biology v. theology, we wouldn’t get to read his awkward yet hilarious dating stories. I spent most of the book alternating between laughter and cooing “awwww” at his various romantic misfortunes. One story in particular involves the situation everyone has found themselves in: thirteen-year-old Feig falls for a pretty older woman (all of age sixteen) at a roller rink, he thinks it’s love. She loves him too–as a friend. How could you not sympathize?  I also loved Feig’s attention to detail, from the music he was listening to down to the color/brand of people’s shoes. It wasn’t distracting, it helped put you in his shoes, making his angst fresh.

Which is unfortunate when you get to  “Please Don’t Read This Chapter.” Seriously, don’t read it. My reaction went something like this: “hee hee…wait…what did he do?…what…oh shit…oh no…oh [expletive!] What the?! Are you serious? What?!” (and no, I’m not telling you what he did. I’m not a fan of spoilers, which is why I don’t post many lines from the books I critique.) That, uh, interesting chapter aside, I still highly recommend Superstud.

Have you read Superstud? Did you read the chapter Feig begged the readers not to read? Share your thoughts in the comments!

Oh! I keep forgetting. CLC has a twitter now. Follow @CelebLitClub, find out when this page is updated and read news relating to celebrity literature/literature in general! I’ll follow you back!

Next Week: How you doin’, Wendy Willams’ The Wendy Williams Experience: Queen of Radio?

*I found this tidbit on IMDb and just had to share.

Advertisements

3 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

3 responses to “When Paul Feig Says “Please Don’t Read This Chapter,” He Means It.

  1. Pingback: “When I Met Heroin, It Was True Love” « Celebrity Lit Club

  2. Pingback: Superstudette: Or How a 24-Year-Old Book Blogger Got a Sex Blog « Celebrity Lit Club

  3. I couldn’t have written it better myself!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s