Marvelous Marie Osmond!

Even before I read Might As Well Laugh About It Now, I had a high level of respect for Marie Osmond. The woman has over come so much in her career and personal life—divorce at twenty-five, a nasty bout of post-partum depression (which is chronicled in her first book, Healing from the Heart: The Inherent Power to Heal) and the recent suicide of her son, Michael Bryan. Although Might As Well Laugh About It Now was written before her son’s untimely death, I cannot believe how strong this woman is. She’s not boasting about her struggles, yet she doesn’t keep them a secret. To her it’s like, “yes, this happened, but I’m not going to dwell on it, I have to keep living my life.”

What I like is that Osmond admits that she had some help writing this book. Marcia Wilkie’s name is on the cover and on the spine, not hidden away in the publishing information page. She’s not going to pretend that she’s the greatest writer. I also like that she chose to write her book as a series of stand alone essays, rather than a grand narrative. You really do feel as if you’re in her kitchen, sharing her stories over a cup of (decaf) coffee.

It’s easy to accuse Osmond of sugar coating her stories—surely there must be some dirt on her famous family. If there is, she’s not going to embarrass her family just to make money. These stories are about Marie, which is a model more celebrity “authors” should follow.  I believe she’s being genuine—just because she didn’t struggle with a cocaine addiction or forgot to wear underwear on the day of a big red carpet event where there were 80,000 photographers doesn’t mean her stories are worthless. She had an eating disorder at a time when nobody really knew what they were or how to treat them. She was a television hostess at age sixteen, and didn’t completely lose her mind. Through it all, she managed to keep up good spirits and a sense of humor.

Most people in my age group (20-25) will most likely dismiss Might As Well Laugh About It Now as a corny, cheesy read. I say, don’t brush it off. With the way the world is, it’s nice to know that there are people who aren’t entirely bitter with the things life has dealt them. Yes, it’s light, but I guarantee you’ll smile.

Have you read Might As Well Laugh About It Now? What did you think? Was it too light? Were you expecting some scandalous Osmond dish? Let me know in the comments section!

Next Week: Lauren Conrad’s work of “fiction,” L.A. Candy

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3 responses to “Marvelous Marie Osmond!

  1. Pingback: “From Now On, When My Name Appears In Print, It’d Better Read ‘Blanche Deveraux COMMA 39!’” « Celebrity Lit Club

  2. Pingback: “When I Met Heroin, It Was True Love” « Celebrity Lit Club

  3. Pingback: “Bad days happen to everyone, but when one happens to you, just keep doing your best and never let a bad day make you feel bad about yourself.” « Celebrity Lit Club

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